6 Places to Learn about Black History in Arizona

It’s not well known that Arizona ended racial segregation of its schools before the Brown v. Board of Education federal ruling. And did you know that Martin Luther King, Jr., one of the most famous blacks in history, spoke in Phoenix the 1960s? With so much discussion about racism happening now, it’s a good time to revisit our state’s African American history. Need Black History Month field trip ideas? Here’s six places you can visit to learn about black history in Arizona:

Table of Contents

1.) Phoenix: Historic Tanner Chapel AME Church

Civil rights leader and pastor Martin Luther King, Jr holds up both hands as he sits
Martin Luther King Jr. spoke at Tanner AME Church in Phoenix on June 3, 1964, | famous African Americans black history | This photo was not taken there | Photo by New York World-Telegram and the Sun staff photographer Dick DeMarsico

Tanner Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church is the only church in Arizona where Martin Luther King, Jr. is known to have delivered a speech. The building was completed in 1929 and is listed in the Phoenix Historic Property Register, one of only fourteen properties in Phoenix, to receive the prestigious landmark status. The historic church is an important part of history in Arizona.

Tanner Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church at 20 S. 8th Street in Phoenix between Washington and Jefferson Streets | Photo by Marine 69-71 at en.wikipedia

The congregation, first organized in 1886, gathers for Sunday worship at 7:45 am, and 10:45 am where one of the most important African Americans in history preached. After the service, have Sunday dinner at Mrs. White’s Golden Rule Café and discuss famous African American black history over home-style Southern and soul food. The family-owned restaurant has been here since the 1960s.

Tanner Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church 20 S. 8th Street in Phoenix between Washington and Jefferson Streets | www.tannerchapel.org

Hear Martin Luther King Jr. speak at the historic Tanner Chapel in an audio recording for a slice of famous black history here.

Learn more about the civil rights leader by reading The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.

2.) Tucson: Dunbar Pavilion African American Arts & Cultural Center

Paul Laurence Dunbar School, Tucson, Arizona | History on Arizona includes segregated schools like this one | Photo by Ipoellet on Wikimedia

Tucson’s first and only segregated schools for African-Americans is home to Dunbar Pavilion, an African American Arts and Cultural Center. The Paul Lawrence Dunbar School, built in 1918, is now on the National Register of Historic Places. The segregated school was named for Paul Laurence Dunbar, the African-American poet. Review his poetry here.

“Hope is tenacious. It goes on living and working when science has dealt it what should be its deathblow.” — Paul Laurence Dunbar

Arizona desegregated its schools a year before the landmark Supreme Court decision, Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 is not a well-known fact of African American black history.

325 W 2nd St, Tucson | Sign up to take a tour at thedunbartucson.org

Read on for more thought-provoking facts about black history in Arizona…

3.) Sierra Vista: Fort Huachuca Museum

African Americans black history in Arizona | Museum currently closed due to COVID-19 | Photo by ToddMorris AlohaTeam via Wikipedia

After the Civil War, black men moved out of the South and away from slavery to make new lives for themselves and their families.  Many first came to the Southwest via the Underground Railroad or as Buffalo Soldiers, one of the Army’s elite black cavalry corps.  Buffalo Soldiers are key parts of Afro American history in Arizona.

At Fort Huachuca Museum, located in what is now a National Historic Landmark and active military base, you’ll discover how the fort became the base for the 10th Cavalry Regiment in 1913. The famed 10th Cavalry was composed of African American soldiers. Their adversaries, the Native Americans gave them the name “Buffalo Soldiers.” From 1916–1917, the base was commanded by Charles Young, the first African American promoted to the rank of colonel.

Also of note for famous African Americans black history, Fort Huachuca is the birthplace of African-American poet and activist Jayne Cortez. Her father, a career soldier, served in both world wars. Click here to check out the price of one of her most famous books entitled Jazz Fan Looks Back.

The army museum, which is currently closed because of COVID-19, is situated on an active Army base. Check closure status at

41401 Grierson Ave, Fort Huachuca near Sierra Vista, Arizona | 800-288-3861

Next: learn more about black history and the Buffalo Soldiers at…

4.) Camp Verde: Fort Verde State Historic Park

Mules pulling a wagon walk on dirt road in front of Fort Verde Military Headquarters building during living history reenactment
Want to know more about what is the history of Arizona? Check out Fort Verde State Historic Park | Courtesy photo

At Fort Verde State Historic Park, learn some black history in USA by exploring the former US Military Headquarters building where Buffalo Soldiers reported for duty. It is one of three historic buildings listed on the National and State Register of Historic Places and furnished in the 1880s period. Troop I of the 10th Cavalry was the first Buffalo Soldiers troop that served at Fort Verde.

Artifacts, photos, videos and interpretive exhibits deliver the stories of Arizona’s Indian Wars and those who lived and served at Fort Verde.

The state park turns into a living history museum Arizona for Fort Verde Days October 10-11, 2020. Flag-raising and lowering ceremonies, Buffalo Soldiers and Indian Wars period re-enactors, cavalry drills, a fashion show and a vintage baseball game are all part of the action. The park is now reopened.

125 E. Hollamon Street, Camp Verde | azstateparks.com/fort-verde

5.) Flagstaff: Murdoch Community Center

Another Paul Laurence Dunbar namesake school was located in Flagstaff. What once was the segregated Dunbar Elementary School, is now the Cleo Murdoch Community Center. The center is temporarily closed due to COVID-19, but you can drive by and see the mural depicting famous black history figures from Flagstaff, community leaders and others from the segregation era.

Portraits include that of Joan Dorsey, who broke the color line in the airline industry when American Airlines hired her as the first black flight attendant in the United States in 1964. Joan, born and raised in Flagstaff, attended Dunbar Elementary School. In 2008, American Airlines honored her as one of the important black women in black history at the C.R. Smith Museum of Aviation in Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas. Flagstaff Mayor Coral Evans is Joan’s niece.

203 E. Brannen Avenue, Flagstaff | www.southsideflagstaff.com

6.) Yuma: Alex Dees Memorial Team Roping Classic

Close up image of handmade belt buckle which reads: "Alex Dees Memorial Team Roping Classic Champion Heeler"
Alex Dees Memorial Team Roping Classic buckle handmade by GK Custom Silver | Photo courtesy of GK Custom Silver

Alex Dees’ reputation as a livestock breeder, consultant, and judge was known worldwide. The third-generation agriculturalist raised Brangus cattle on his ranch, which African American farmers settled in the 1920s. The Alex Dees Memorial Team Roping Classic remembers the Arizona rancher, and his achievements, which include:

  • National Multicultural Western Heritage Museum Hall of Fame
  • First black Grand Marshal of the Silver Spur Rodeo and Parade, Yuma 
  • America Brangus Breeders Hall of Fame
  • Outstanding Benefactor Philanthropist of the Year, Heart of Yuma award
  • Arizona Hall of Fame
  • International Brangus Breeders Association Pioneer Awardee (Dees is one of only two breeders to receive this award.)

Check out the Alex Dees Memorial Team Roping Classic at the Yuma County Mounted Posse Arena on January 16-17, 2021. If you’re eager for more, the 76th Annual Yuma Silver Spur Rodeo is set for February 12-14, 2021. Tentative date for the rodeo parade is February 13, 2021.

Alex Dees is one of the Arizona people who made a difference in black history.

See the award-winning movie about the legendary Alex Dees here:

As is common in the travel industry, UNSTOPPABLE Stacey may have been provided with accommodations, meals, and other compensation for the purpose of parts of this review. While it has not influenced this review, the Arizona travel writer believes in full disclosure of all potential conflicts of interest.

In addition, this blog, UNSTOPPABLE Stacey Travel, contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through these links, Stacey earns a commission at no extra cost to you. These commissions help reduce the costs of keeping this travel blog active. 

Further, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Thanks for reading.

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8 thoughts on “6 Places to Learn about Black History in Arizona”

  1. Stacey, this is one of my favorite-of-all-times articles that you have written. Good job! It was very informative and made me want to visit some of those places as soon as we can travel again. Thanks for all your hard work.

    Reply
    • Thank you for your kind words, Joyce. I’m happy to hear that this was one of your favorite-of-all-times articles that I’ve penned. That’s a great compliment. I’m happy to encourage others to travel… and learn… and gain compassion.

      Reply
  2. Thank you for the information on Alex Dees. I hope young African American go and visit the sites in the state of Arizona. God Bless You.

    Reply
    • Thank you sooo much for your comment Ethel. I wish I could have met Alex Dees. What a legendary man. Thank you for your blessing. God bless YOU.

      Reply
  3. Great information to pursue. Really enjoyed reading up on Black history. So good to hear about Alex Dees doing great works as an agriculturalist. Press on with the information. Thanks

    Reply
    • Thanks for commenting on this story, Pamela. It is heartwarming to know that people want to hear more about black history in Arizona. Do you know of any places that I should add? Would love to hear your recommendations. I was looking for a place that might have an Alex Dees monument or statue. Or display in a museum. Thanks for your help, UNSTOPPABLE Stacey

      Reply

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